Plant Based Workshop with HSUS

Plant Based Workshop with HSUS

Plant-Based Culinary Training Curriculum with The Humane Society of the United States

PHILADELPHIA, PA (August 24, 2017) - Aramark (NYSE: ARMK), a global leader in food, facilities and uniforms, announced today that it will partner with The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) to conduct a series of plant-based culinary trainings over the next six months as part of its ongoing efforts to develop strategies that increase plant-based food offerings for consumers.

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AASHE Conference 2017: San Antonio

AASHE Conference 2017: San Antonio

  AASHE 2017 Conference, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio  

 

AASHE 2017 Conference, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio  

Getting ready for the opening keynote address

Getting ready for the opening keynote address

Opening keynote: Dr. Katharine Hayhoe

Opening keynote: Dr. Katharine Hayhoe

Student sustainability project by Mohawk College

Student sustainability project by Mohawk College

Poster Session by Central Community College on the future of insect protein as a food source. 

Poster Session by Central Community College on the future of insect protein as a food source. 

Ken Botts from HSUS presents on #PlantsOnThePlate

Ken Botts from HSUS presents on #PlantsOnThePlate

5 reasons to eat veggies: Plant-Based Diets

5 reasons to eat veggies: Plant-Based Diets

All meals presented were Plant-Based

All meals presented were Plant-Based

Barilla Modern Casual Summit & Chicago Food Tour

Barilla Modern Casual Summit & Chicago Food Tour

Barilla Development Kitchen Northbrook, IL

Barilla Development Kitchen
Northbrook, IL

Chef Lorenzo Boni

Chef Lorenzo Boni

When it comes to pasta, quality is key. With the expert culinary guidance of Chef Lorenzo Boni, Executive Chef for Barilla America, Barilla is dedicated to delivering the highest-quality pasta. That is why Barilla- the leading brand of pasta in Italy -is a favorite of foodservice chefs. Whether serving the needs of restaurants, cafeterias, commissaries, or other foodservice operations, our full line of versatile Barilla products brings excellence to any menu. And today, affordable quality has never been more important. 

Barilla, originally established in 1877 as a bread and pasta shop in Parma, Italy, ranks as one of today's top Italian food groups. Barilla is a leader in the global pasta business, the pasta sauces business in continental Europe, the bakery products business in Italy and the crispbread business in Scandinavia. 

Barilla has become one of the world's most esteemed food companies and is recognized globally as a symbol of Italian know-how by upholding its longstanding traditional principles and values, considering employees as a fundamental asset and developing leading-edge production systems. 

This invite-only retreat is for a select group of chefs to dive into the most current trends in casual dining, with Barilla as the host and anchor point for the content. Featuring hands-on cooking sessions, chefs dive into regional Italian cuisine with Chef Lorenzo Boni and tackle making healthier dining delicious and approachable. We’ll also be joined by renowned speaker and trends guru Gerry Ludwig who will take us on an exclusive tour of the trend-setting restaurants in Chicago. 

Participation ideation session one

Chefs Jasper, Matthew & Brock

Chefs Jasper, Matthew & Brock

Parsnip Veggie Mac

Parsnip Veggie Mac

Asian Fideo Bowl

Asian Fideo Bowl

Chef Gerry Ludwig, CEC

Chef Gerry is a nationally recognized food writer, speaker, and trend tracker, and leads the Culinary R&D department for Gordon Food Service, based in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Through ongoing analysis of foodservice-related statistical, media and empirical data, Gerry creates trends-based culinary solutions that are executed at the operator level by the company's team of menu consultants. He is a columnist and editorial board member for the foodservice trend magazine Flavor & The Menu, conducts seminars and workshops at numerous industry events and executes resturant research tours in major cities throughout the United States. 

Gerry Ludwig (@GFSChefGerry) | Twitter

The latest Tweets from Gerry Ludwig (@GFSChefGerry). Representing Gordon Food Service through culinary research and development, restaurant trend tracking, food writing and public speaking

 

The Little Goat

Stephanie Izard's diner serving a huge menu of creative, gourmet takes on comfort food classics.
Address: 820 W Randolph St, Chicago, IL 60607

 

Latinicity 

Sprawling, stylish food hall featuring a range of Latin-inspired eateries & a market in lofty digs.
Address: 108 N State Street, 3rd Floor, Chicago, IL 60602

 

de Quay Resturant

Dishes mixing Dutch and Indonesian influences plus craft brews & global wines in intimate digs.
Address: 2470 N Lincoln Ave, Chicago, IL 60614

 

Split-Rail Restaurant

Updated American comfort foods & craft cocktails are offered in a funky space with a vintage vibe.
Address: 2500 W Chicago Ave, Chicago, IL 60622

 

Moneygun & Saint Lou's Assembly

Hip, understated bar serving traditional cocktails, plus creative New American small plates.
Address: 660 W Lake St, Chicago, IL 60661

American spot for creative takes on old-school, customizable comfort-food platters.
Address: 664 W Lake St, Chicago, IL 60661

 

El Che Bar

Wood-fired Argentinean-American fare & South American cocktails doled out in hip, stylish surrounds.
Address: 845 W Washington Blvd, Chicago, IL 60607

 

...and in case you were wondering what my Fitbit had to say about all these shennanigans:

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Matunuck Oyster Farm Tour

Matunuck Oyster Farm Tour

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The September ACF Rhode Island Chapter meeting was hosted by Matunuck Oyster Bar. We participated in a boat tour of the oyster farm operation, followed by dinner in the restaurant. Perry Raso, Owner of Matunuck Oyster Bar & Farm was a gracious host. It was a great kickoff to a new year! 

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Fresh Food Company Training

Fresh Food Company Training

The Fresh Food Company has transformed the dining experience at campuses across the country, earning superior customer satisfaction scores and unparalleled praise from our clients since we opened our first location. We hosted the Summer 2017 Fresh Food Company Training on August 1 – 2 at Southern Methodist University

This intense and highly interactive two-day training combines classroom and hands-on experience to equip attendees to optimally operate our Fresh Food Company brand.  The class taught methods and systems for creativity to assist in the consistent execution of the Fresh Food Company menu, providing the skills and resources needed to elevate our dining program to the next level in food and customer service and will address the key expectation that the consumer experience at our Fresh Food Company locations exceeds those anywhere else in Higher Education.

Thank you to the team at Southern Methodist University for their hospitality and to Chef Ben Hernandez, for leading this session.  

Pulse Workshop

Pulse Workshop

Aramark Chefs were joined by representatives from the US Dry Pea and Pulse Council for an introduction session to incorporate Pulses into more of our recipes. Tim McGreevy, CEO at USA Dry Pea and Lentil Council, Jessie Hunter, and Alexei Rudolf are here to share knowledge and insights about these powerful plant forward ingredients, and Christine Farkas and our own Scott Zahren will talk and let us taste samples from their experiences cooking with all types of pulses during the Pulses of Change workshop earlier in April.

Dry peas, lentils, and chickpeas— known as pulse or legume crops—are among the world’s most ancient commodities. Archeologists have discovered peas in caves in what is present day Thailand that date back more than 11,000 years. The royal Egyptian tombs contained lentils, which were meant to sustain the dead on their journey to the afterlife. In the Christian Bible, Esau sold his birthright for a pottage of lentils. And, in Italy, the names for peas (Pisum sp.), lentils (Lens culinaris), and chickpeas (Cicer arietinum) found their way into the names of the prominent Roman families of Piso, Lentulus, and Cicero. According to Italian writer and Academic Umberto Eco, it may even be true that peas, beans, and lentils actually saved Western Civilization during the Early Middle Ages (476 to 1000 AD). It is well documented that the introduction of pulses into crop rotation practices resulted not only in increased farm productivity, but also in improved protein content and a more diverse and nutritional diet for the populace. The development is credited with saving generations of people from malnutrition and helping facilitate the repopulation of Europe after the Black Plague pandemic of the late 1340s.

Tim McGreevy, CEO at USA Dry Pea and Lentil Council

Tim McGreevy, CEO at USA Dry Pea and Lentil Council

Perhaps in recognition of legumes’ extraordinary qualities, many cultures have developed a range of traditions in which the eating of peas and lentils figure prominently. Among the most notable is No Ruz, the New Year’s celebration in Iran. During this 13-day celebration, every house maintains a table known as the “seven S’s,” which includes seven symbolic objects beginning with the letter S. Germinating lentil seeds, known as sabzi, hold the place of honor in the center of the table to symbolize renewal and rebirth. For hundreds of years, the people of northern Italy have enjoyed their own New Year’s tradition called Capo d’Anno (literally “head of the year”) in which lentils, symbolizing coins, are eaten to ensure good fortune for the year ahead. Consuming these “coins” is thought to make wealth and prosperity part of one’s blood and being. Eating lentils, rather than more exotic or expensive foods, is also considered an act of humility to both heaven and society, and a means for averting the sin of pride.

Chef Tim Zintz and Chef Scott Zahren culinary demo on Whipped Potato & White Bean

Chef Tim Zintz and Chef Scott Zahren culinary demo on Whipped Potato & White Bean

Over time, the United States has seen much of its own rich tradition of eating legumes replaced by a preference for fast food and microwavable meals. Fortunately, Americans are starting to rediscover these overlooked ingredients. Nutritionists have, for example, begun pointing to the legume rich diets of the Mediterranean as one possible route to improved health. The media, meanwhile, is increasingly touting the benefits of the nutritional attributes and phytochemicals found in legumes. Recent research shows that the antioxidants, flavonoids, plant estrogens, vitamins, minerals, protein, and fiber in legumes can help prevent, and may even contribute to, the reversal of many major chronic diseases. Add these health benefits to their delicious flavor and incredible culinary versatility and it is little wonder that Americans are once again finding a place for peas, lentils, and chickpeas in their diets and on their dining
room tables. 

Chefs jumped in the kitchen to create recipes. Here are some of the creations:

Fresh Food Company Training

Fresh Food Company Training

The Fresh Food Company has transformed the dining experience at campuses across the country, earning superior customer satisfaction scores and unparalleled praise from our clients since we opened our first location. We hosted the Summer 2017 Fresh Food Company Training on July 11th – 12th  at James Madison University.

This intense and highly interactive two-day training combines classroom and hands-on experience to equip attendees to optimally operate our Fresh Food Company brand.  The class taught methods and systems for creativity to assist in the consistent execution of the Fresh Food Company menu, providing the skills and resources needed to elevate our dining program to the next level in food and customer service and will address the key expectation that the consumer experience at our Fresh Food Company locations exceeds those anywhere else in Higher Education.

Thank you to the team at James Madison University for their hospitality and to Jason Forrest, Regional Culinary Director, for leading this session.  

Tony Johnson teaches the segment on Service Excellence

Tony Johnson teaches the segment on Service Excellence

So stoked to be part of the #FreshFoodCompany training video. #WereReadyForOurCloseUp 😎

A post shared by JMU Dining Services (@jmudining) on

Preservice Team Huddle, Filmed by Denis Robichaud Design

Fresh Food Company Training, JMU Class of 2017

Fresh Food Company Training, JMU Class of 2017

Chef Council Summit, Boston

Chef Council Summit, Boston

Chefs from Aramark in Boston met on June 27 and 28 at Newbury College in Brookline, MA to discuss menu trends, culinary innovation, and sustainable ingredients. Thank you to Newbury College for donating the Mitten House Kitchen facilities for this summit! 

Randy Sherman, Berklee College
Jessica Albright, New England Conservatory
Peter Metcalfe, Regis College
Alex Fernandez, Newbury College
Adam Poitras, Fisher College
Mark Oshiro, Boston University

Our program began with a review of our culinary philosophy and review of GOE, Channel Growth, and OpX menu resources. 

The Chefs formed teams of two and cooked a mystery basket for each other. The purpose of this exercise was to collaborate on innovative food delivery and flavor profiles. Teams had access to a common pantry of produce, dairy and grocery items. A mystery basket of items will also be provided.

Mystery Basket included: Du Puy Lentils, Organic Turkish Figs, Quark, English Breakfast Radish, NY Native Garlic Scapes, Pork Belly, Spanish Mackerel, and Bell & Evans Cornish Game Hen

Mystery Basket included: Du Puy Lentils, Organic Turkish Figs, Quark, English Breakfast Radish, NY Native Garlic Scapes, Pork Belly, Spanish Mackerel, and Bell & Evans Cornish Game Hen

The logistics and requirements for the Mystery Basket are as follows:

After a tour of the kitchen and a review of the mystery ingredients, you will write your menu and submit. The menu criteria is 3 Courses

  • an hors d'oeuvre or canape appropriate for an upscale cocktail party
  • non-leafy green, appetizer or composed salad
  • a plated entree with appropriate accompaniments, sauces and/or garnishes

Please serve (12) twelve identical pieces of your hors d'oeurve on a cocktail platter and (4) four identical portions of each plated course to be presented one after the other in proper sequence restaurant style. You have up to three (3) hours to produce this meal. 
 
Please remember that Aramark places great value on the physical safety of our employees. Chefs were asked to please come with chef coat, hat, slip resistant footwear, and a cutting glove. 

Your goal is to show culinary expertise, kitchen presence, respect for proper food handling techniques and safety.  Here is what we are looking for and if achieved a recipe for success;

  • A methodical approach to menu writing
  • Authentic approach to global flavors
  • Appreciation for simple, local comfort food
  • Creative on Trend approach to Presentation

Chef Mark Benanchietti, PCIII from MIT joined us for the critique.

Here is what the team created:

Plates by Chef Alex Fernandez, Newbury College

Plates by Chef Peter Metcalfe, Regis College and Chef Adam Poitras, Fisher College

Plates from Chef Randy Sherman, Berklee College and Chef Jessica Albright, New England Conservatory

On June 28, we were joined by Jamey Lionette, Director of Sustainable Seafood Program from Red's Best. Chefs participated in a whole fish demonstration and hands-on cooking seminar.

Aramark Higher Education is excited to partner with local fishermen to deliver sustainably sourced, premium ingredients to the campuses we serve. 

...yes, Chef Alex did kiss his fish!

Here are some of the delicious dishes created by our Chefs:

After a delicious lunch we met to discuss industry trends and menu innovation. Chefs used this information to craft their fall menus. This collaborative opportunity proved very valuable to all participants!

CIA Menus of Change

CIA Menus of Change

More than 400 chefs, scientists, food manufacturers and other professionals whose careers concern the intersection of food, health and sustainability gathered last week for the fifth annual Menus of Change conference. 

During the three-day event at the CIA's campus in Hyde Park, N.Y., the initiative's two advisory councils -- made up of leading scientists, analysts and foodservice business leaders -- shared the findings of the 2017 Menus of Change report. Information sessions offered insights on topics from adding plant-forward dishes to the menu and overhauling school lunch to battling climate change and increasing transparency at multi-unit foodservice operations. In his opening remarks, Greg Drescher, vice president of strategic initiatives and industry leadership for the CIA, highlighted the recently released CIA-EAT Plant-Forward Global 50 list that reflects the critical role chefs are playing in improving the global food system and influencing consumer choices.

This Special Report offers an overview of the 2017 Menus of Change report and conference, along with resources that chefs and food companies can use at their operations. Read on for a look at some of the chefs and restaurants making headlines due to their commitment to the type of healthy and sustainable food practices championed by Menus of Change.

To stay informed about what's new in food, sign up for this free e-newsletter and read SmartBrief's original industry coverage on SmartBrief.com. Follow @SB_Food on Twitter for more culinary news and updates.

Food world embraces plant-based eating
(The Culinary Institute of America)

Chefs and others in the foodservice industry are making great progress when it comes to creating menus that emphasize and celebrate plant-based foods, according to the 2017 Menus of Change Annual Report. "The idea of plant-forward eating moved from a burgeoning term in the prior year to the default phrase for capturing the rising status of vegetables and plant proteins on American menus," the report noted.
SmartBrief/Food & Beverage (6/21) 

Susilo Symposium

Susilo Symposium

The second annual Susilo Symposium hosted by the Susilo Institute for Ethics in the Global Economy will be held on June 15-17, 2017 at Boston University Questrom School of Business.

The event will feature distinguished speakers and panelists, including Professor Francesca Gino of Harvard Business School, and site visits at Aeronaut Brewing, Bright Horizons, and Fenway Park, among other exciting area companies.

The Susilo Symposium will be part of a new Global Business Ethics Week, which begins at Bentley University from June 12-15 for the Global Business Ethics Symposium and teaching workshop, and then will move to BU for June 15-17.

Panels and Presentations

The program is directed specifically toward both academics and practitioners. It features over fifteen plenary and panel sessions with nearly sixty speakers, including:

  • Up-to-the-minute sessions such as “Values, Culture, and Trust,” “Inherent Bias,” and “Globally Responsible Leadership.”
  • A broad range of perspectives shared by speakers from China, India, Europe, and North America.
  • Multiple panels and papers on issues including corporate social responsibility (CSR), and examining cases drawn from both East and West vantage points.
  • Insightful speakers who challenge your assumptions, and whose sessions range from “Is It Profitable to Persuade with Purpose?” to “Publishing in Business Ethics Journals Today.”

Site Visits

The Susilo Symposium is more than a conference. It features onsite visits to global corporations and the latest start-ups, from which you will learn about today’s cutting-edge responses to challenging dilemmas. You’ll have the opportunity to learn how organizations are grappling with business ethics issues at Aeronaut Brewing, Bright Horizons, Boston Harbor Now, Panera Cares, and Fenway Park. 

In addition, the conference design intentionally builds in plenty of opportunities for networking among your colleagues and between academics and practitioners, including a Thursday evening social event, a Friday luncheon and Friday evening reception.